Self-Talk

Rehearsal is often key to a piece of writing as we think how it might go, try out the words and perhaps “dream the dream” of it.

I noticed my mind — one small department in my neuro structure, anyway, plans and rehearses for a class or an event as if I am creating it. That’s how powerful rehearsal can feel. I was watching my thoughts and feeling that I was arranging things to be just so. So what if these stories become habituated and self tell even when the situation changes?

Tonight I was talking with my sister on the phone about pain management and ways to develop a different story other than that one of a protracted struggle. Even when the body gets better, often the brain doesn’t believe it sends out the same messages.

One thing a Dr. Alexander did, who had been a back surgeon who became a patient requiring back surgery during his life…one part of his recovery was to write daily. Fifteen minutes, free write — meaning any subject, any stream of consciousness. Writing helped him re-map his mind’s imagery and his pain.

Peter Elbow, of course, is an advocate for free writing within composition or writing courses for the many benefits it brings to developing writers. I had never thought of the wider idea that free writing could be a way for the mind/body connect to re-wire in some way. Hm, I wonder?

I do know that free writing is good for my moods and brings clarity often to things which I cannot sort in my usual cognitive mode.

And, after talking to my sister, I began to think about the seemingly simply but powerful effect of studying kriya yoga and meditation. The simple instruction, in addition to setting time aside to sit, is to pay attention to the quality of my thoughts. And commit to being happy.

That’s done a bit of re-education in my brain. So now I want to learn more about ways that my dear mom, who has gotten some relief from a device implanted in between two vertebrae, how she might benefit from release from her brain’s long conditioned response as she has suffered debilitating pain. With writing. With releasing tension. With posture.

It seems simple, but I suspect there’s more to it. Not meaning complexity, but efficacy.

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